Things to Consider when Coloring your Pet

I’m sure you’ve heard of clothing for pets but here in the pet fashion world they have step up individuality Chanella bunch by introducing pet dye. Personally I love that there is an option to spice up my dogs coat. But there are some pro and cons with dyeing your pet, you first must make sure that it is pet safe dye that you are using. Some people think that dying your pet is awesome and some people think its cruel, the most important thing to remember is the safety of your pet if you decide to add some color.

Some of the pros for pet dye are:

  • freaking awesome looking hair
  • life of the party
  • complements from strangers
  • ability to express your pets personality
  • match your outfits with your dog

Some of the cons for pet dye is that it can cause:

  • Rashes
  • Skin irritation
  • Skin burns
  • Unsafe chemicals that pets can possible ingest

 

There are multiple ways to dye your pet some more permanent than other s. Most commondipper way is to use Manic Panic or Kool- Aid, I’ve used dog friendly blow pens, chalk, Manic Panic, and gel. While personally I prefer the blow pens since they only last about a week or so, Manic Panic is more permanent choice which usually lasts about 2 weeks. My boys are used for events for my work all the time, Dipper my Boston Terrier loves being dyed and will strut his stuff for anyone watching as long as he has a little more color in his coat.

dye

The awesome thing about blow pens is the possibility to use stencils and create customs designs. The grooming industry has boomed with the idea of fur dyeing and making dogs look exotic.

photo 1 (7)Nowadays you’ll see dogs looking like tigers, pandas, people chose certain themes just like we put a bunch of hearts on my co-workers dog.

 

While adding a splash of color might be super fun please remember to dye responsibly.

 

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It’s a dog’s life! Frolicking with friends at the local daycare, chasing squirrels in the back yard, sitting on laps, and eating yummy kibble everyday … life can be SO hard sometimes! With our pet’s tough schedules, there is always time for a spa day and pampering can not only be pleasing to the eye but also beneficial for a pet’s inner workings which include the not so delightful subject: anal sacs or “scent glands”.

ImageNot too many are familiar with anal sacs or how issues with them are caused. If you have found Fido lately to be doing a sort of “scooting” maneuver, licking more than usual in the hind area, or any look of discomfort while laying down, there is a chance he may be in need of a little TLC “down there”.

All animals have anal sacs. They just use them differently. Wild animals such as skunks use them as a defense mechanism, while domestic furry friends  use them more as territorial markings and a way to greet other canines.

These sacs are located within the anus of the dog and typically empty (or “express”) its potent, liquid substance whenever the dog defecates. However, it is possible for the glands to not exert enough pressure to release which could lead to discomfort and pain. If not expressed often, bacteria and other infections could form and could potentially lead to pricey veterinary visits and, worst of all, an irritated, swollen bum for little Fido.

Pet Stylists have the chance to bathe, trim, as well as examine the anal glands. Upon inspection, the groomer will squeeze the sacs to ease any tension that may have been built up over time. This prevents possible future anal gland challenges. In case of an infection or abnormality, it’s best to have a medical professional look and handle these types of ailments rather than attempting to remedy the situation yourself which could further injure your furry family member. The groomer will tell you if Fido needs to visit the veterinarian.

The importance of clean hygiene could not be  “expressed” more. Make an appointment with a recommended pet bather and/or groomer . Ask if anal gland expression is a part of their routine. Your pet can then enjoy a spa treatment that is not only aesthetically pleasing but is a major health benefit, too!

Holiday Safety Tips by Fit ‘N’ Furry

With Christmas and New Year’s just right around the corner we want to make sure that both you and your four-legged companions enjoy this festive season safely.  It’s best to keep-up your pets eating and exercise routine as much as possible. During this busy time we often get distracted and tend to break away from our normal daily activities, and since pets, dogs especially, are so routine based, they too can pick up on our bad behavior and start acting up. Here are a few tips to keep in mind this holiday:

  • NO TABLE SCRAPS – We know it’s tempting to give your furry pals a treat from the dinner table, but holiday foods tend to be richer than what they are used to eating and can cause severe diarrhea and stomach upset.  Bones are really bad idea because they can be swallowed and get stuck in the digestive tract, causing painful stomach cramps for your pooch and painful cramps in your wallet from the visit to the vet.  Avoid the passing of human foods and opt for a pet-friendly treat, you’ll be thankful when you’re not stuck cleaning up a dog mess right before the friends and relatives arrive.
  • NO TINSEL – These shiny, light reflecting strands are very attractive to kitties. They love batting it around and getting all tangled up in it, but whats even worse is when they start biting on these little strands. If swallowed your cat may suffer from severe vomiting, dehydration, and an obstructed digestive tract, which could require expensive surgery.
  • NO HOLLY or MISTLETOE – When ingested by four-legged pals gastrointestinal and cardiovascular problems may occur. Try artificial plants. Contrary to popular belief Poinsettias, also known as the Christmas Star plant, are not poisonous to you or your pets.  Also be sure your Christmas tree is safely secured to prevent it tipping over and possibly injuring a pet, family member, or guest.
  • NO WIRES – Be sure to keep wires such as tree lights or electronics up off the floor and out of reach from your pets. They could get a severe shock if they took a nibble on those wires.  Be especially aware of new puppies, we all know they find everything to get into.

If you are traveling this season keep your pets in mind.  Ask yourself,  “Who’s going to take care of Sparky and Garfield?”  Check out local pet care facilities and ask the right questions.

  • Are they able to provide the care and attention you give at home? Remember, pets are very routine-based, they probably let you know when it’s time to eat or go to the bathroom, right?
  • Are the pets indoors or outdoors for most of their visit? Keep in mind the weather temperatures and climate of your area or the area you are traveling to.
  • What vaccinations are required for your pets?
  • Will the facility need to meet your pets before they come to visit?
  • What kind of pet food they serve?  Can you bring your own?
  • Can they administer medication for pets who need extra-special care?

These are all important things to know before checking your pets in for a holiday.  Hope everyone and their beloved furry, four-legged friends have a Happy Holiday and a Merry New Year!

Canine’s and Leadership According to Fit ‘N’ Furry

Whether you’re looking to train your new pup or teach your old dog new tricks, it’s never an easy task. It’s always a good idea to start training right away with a new pooch, they learn to take direction and understand that you’re the pack leader. Socialization is also key when acclimating a new puppy. Basic and foundation commands should be established between you and your dog. Dogs sense of hearing tend to be much better than humans, so when giving commands, you don’t need to yell, just use a very “mater-of-fact” tone.

We tend to humanize our pets with lots of affection and not enough discipline. Because of this, many of us find it difficult to scold our pets or provide consequences in regards to behavior.  It is important for us to find a balance between affection and discipline. The most important thing to remember is to not expect results immediately, especially with an older dog. A dog’s behavior might take weeks to break, but consistency is of the utmost importance.

Many trainers use different techniques when training. When looking for a trainer, keep in mind the necessary tasks that may need to be incorporated into your pet’s home life, for example: new commands, feeding habits, new accessories, etc. Be sure to ask your trainer questions and follow up on their recommendations. Many trainers can customize training sessions for the specific needs of you and your dog. Call around to local trainers in your area for more information on the kind of training they provide. Like children, dogs crave structure, discipline and leadership. Remember to be patient, calm, and balanced, but also have fun when working with your pet!

FitnFurry Asks, “When Is The Time To Say Goodbye To A Faithful Friend?”

To put your pet down, or to not put your pet down, that is the extremely difficult question many of us pet owners are faced with at some time or another.  Some questions to ask yourself are: Is my pet suffering or in pain in any way?  How has his/her quality of life changed? Is my pet exhibiting severe or dangerous behavior? Ask yourself these questions and I feel you might have an answer to our first question.

Everyone has their own role in a household, including your pet. Both you and your pet know what role they are there to fulfill.  Dr. Nancy Kay, author of “Speaking for Spot” suggests these questions: “Does my pet still respond enthusiastically to the things that would normally excite him/her?  Do the good days still seem to outnumber the bad?  When you get down on the ground and go eyeball-to-eyeball with your dear companion, do you still see that familiar spark in his/her eyes that let you know that he/she wants to keep on going?  Do you sense your pet is ‘hanging in there’ and putting on his/her game face in order to take care of you? Your always-loyal best friend may feel that he/she doesn’t have ‘permission to pass away’ because you, his/her most beloved human, aren’t quite ready to let go.”

A lot of times your pet will know when it’s time to go. They might even start distancing themselves from the family. Such as if your pet sleeps with you at night, he/she might start sleeping in another part of the room or house. Pack animals are known to separate themselves from the pack if they’ve become injured or weak to help prevent the stronger pack leaders from being hurt by protecting them.

The decision to put a pet to sleep is always difficult and intensely personal.  In most cases you will probably have some time to weigh your options and to speak with family and friends, unless there is some urgency, such as an untreatable injury or illness.  It’s a heart breaking experience for all pet owners, but surrounding yourself with people who knew and also loved your pet can bring a sense of closure.  Remembering your pet in a positive way and all the loving moments you shared together can be a comforting exercise to do with your family, especially with younger children.  Let them know that Buddy isn’t suffering anymore, that he’s no longer in distress, and encourage them to think of all the fun/happy times.  Celebrate the times your family shared with Buddy and always remember the unconditional love you and your family experienced during Buddy’s life. If you have loved and lost a pet, I wish you serenity and acceptance over the sadness of your pet’s passing.

Going To The Vet With FitnFurry

Going to the vet can be a very frightening or stressful experience for your dog. Your furry friend may exhibit behaviors that they normally would not in the home setting. These behaviors can range anywhere from a usually timid dog becoming aggressive to a confident dog becoming frightened and scared. These are all behaviors that can be avoided with the proper training and simple exercises. For more on these training techniques and exercises please visit Dr. Kay’s web blog: http://speakingforspot.com/blog, where she gets tips from Jennifer Hack, a Chicago based professional dog trainer and behavior specialist.