How to Care For Your Senior Pets

Thanks to remarkable technological advances in veterinary medicine, pets are now living longer than ever before. But, along with the increased lifespan of our pets, comes a long list of conditions that can negatively affect them like: weight and movement issues such as osteoarthritis, kidney, heart, and liver disease; tumors and cancers; hormone disorders such as diabetes and thyroid imbalance; and many others. It’s important for pet owners to work closely with their veterinarian to arrange a health plan that is best for their senior pet.

Keep in mind that we as pet owners can also slow down and or ease the aging process of our furry family members. By providing your pet with routine mental and physical stimulation, this can help slow down the aging process drastically. Regular massaging isn’t only good for elderly pets with stiff joints but also helps improve circulation throughout the body. Countless research studies have also shown that continual mental stimulation helps the brain grow and allow more connections to be made throughout the process. You can slow the natural decay of the brain by routinely providing your dog with mental stimulation.

A healthy diet is also key when it comes to elderly pets. Feed your pets regular well balanced meals with high levels of antioxidants and minerals needed to sustain high performance; keeping in accordance to veterinary recommendations. Feeding your elderly pets balanced portions of grains, minerals and healthy fats will surely help increase life expectancy.

Just as the health care needs of humans change as we age, the same applies to pets. Over time, as your pet’s body ages, their heart muscles become less efficient—essentially working harder to pump the same amount of blood through their body. In addition, the blood vessels lose some of their elasticity and hardened fatty deposits may form on the inner walls of your pet’s arteries, called atherosclerosis. These changes make the arteries stiffer, causing your pet’s heart to work even harder to pump blood through them. This can lead to hypertension and other cardiovascular problems as well as extensive weight gain and the inability to shed those extra pounds. Although fast paced cardiovascular activity for your elderly pet is frowned upon, several short slow-paced walks or playtime can be just as beneficial.

In order to help your elderly pets live comfortably during their senior years, it is critical to work closely with your veterinarian to tailor a wellness plan for your pet. Remember to keep a close eye on behavioral and physical conditions and report anything unusual to your veterinarian who can help your pet reach its golden years with ease!

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Flea & Tick Prevention For Your Pets!

They may be small enough to fit on the head of a pin, but  we all know that fleas and ticks can be the cause of major problems for both dogs and their owners. In one day, a flea can attack you cat or dog by biting them more than 400 times, consuming more than its body weight of your pets blood. And before its finished, a female flea can lay hundreds of eggs on your unsuspecting furry friend, making him the unsuspecting host of many future flea generations! As a result, itching and scratching from flea bites can lead to skin irritations, open sores and even fur loss. And let’s not forget about ticks! Tick bites aren’t just irritating; they may cause allergic reactions as well as transmit disease such as Lyme Disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. And ticks can give the same infections to you!

Here are a few tips to help prevent flea and tick infestations on your furry friends:

  • Keep dogs on a leash when walking or hiking;
  • Comb your pet with a flea comb regularly;
  • Vacuum often and dispose of bags immediately after use;
  • Mow areas of the lawn where your dog spends time;
  • Wash pet bedding weekly and bathe your pet with a pet shampoo recommended by your veterinarian;
  • If your dog spends time in wooded areas, hand-check for ticks often;
  • Mark your calendars for regular application of flea and tick treatments;
  • Also, flea and tick collars provide long-lasting protection against fleas and ticks with no mess and no fuss!

Natural Remedies for Flea and Tick Prevention:

  • Add a teaspoon of Grapefruit Seed Oil to your pets water once a week;
  • Brewer’s yeast is also a common natural remedy for dogs with fleas. Holistic veterinarian Richard Pitcairn recommends it for that purpose. It is thought to work against fleas because it contains sulfur compounds that make your dog less palatable to fleas;
  • Add no more than 2 tablespoons of Apple Cider Vinegar into a large bowl of water. Or Make a spray of 50% ACV and 50% water and spray onto your dogs coat. Make sure to avoid their eyes!
  • And Red Cedar shavings and bedding help prevent fleas and ticks as well. The aroma of Cedar oil overwhelms the breathing system of fleas and ticks and causes them to die almost immediately!

Keep in mind that regular bathing and grooming is also key for a healthy pet!