Fit’n’Furry’s Canine Summer Safety Tips

Keeping your canine companion cool during these hot summer months is crucial to your pet’s health.  Dogs are very susceptible to dehydration and heat exhaustion, especially those “short-faced” breeds, such as pugs and bulldogs because of their vulnerable breathing ability. A canine’s only way of releasing heat is through the bottoms of their paws, where the sweat glands are located, and by panting. Even with these unique cooling systems, when temperatures climb, your pet may become overwhelmed, especially in humid conditions.

So what happens when dogs get too hot? The most common result is heatstroke. Symptoms of canine heatstroke can include an increase in heart rate, labored breathing, purplish gum color, weakness resulting in collapsing, and even seizures, coma, or sudden death can be an onset of heatstroke. Most cases involving canine heatstroke are a result of confinement to a non-ventilated area, such as a car. Temperatures inside a vehicle even with the windows rolled down can rise to above 120 degrees.

Heatstroke can also occur due to over-activity on hot days. The excitement of chasing a ball or a Frisbee outweighs everything else in a dog mind. Your dog may not know when it’s time to stop playing and take a break, so be aware of your dog’s activity and breathing.

Also keep in mind that you are wearing shoes to protect your feet from the hot surfaces on the ground but your pooch isn’t and the severe heat of pavement or sand on a hot summer day can be very damaging to their little pads. Most pet stores or boutiques will carry adjustable dog booties that come in different sizes to protect your dog’s paws. Dr. Nancy Kay, author of Speaking for Spot, suggests going for walks in the early morning or evening hours when temperatures are generally cooler.

Another suggestion Martha Stewart makes is putting Vaseline on the pads of your pooch to reduce its heat level.

Summertime and playtime go hand-in-hand for both humans and their beloved furry pals. We especially want to take them everywhere with us on our exciting adventures, but be advised that the best place for your pet is indoors. You may want to consider taking your canine companion to an indoor doggie play area where temperatures are controlled and your dog can be monitored. This would provide your pet with some fun exercise without getting overheated or burning their paws.

Be sure your dog has access to plenty of fresh, cool water throughout the day and is kept in a cool area, preferably in an air-conditioned home or facility. Sunscreen is also important for our furry friends, especially dogs with white noses and/or markings. When slathering on the sunscreen, be sure to put some on those white spots of your pooch.

Here’s to a cool, comfortable, fun-for-all canine summer!

Advertisements

Going To The Vet With FitnFurry

Going to the vet can be a very frightening or stressful experience for your dog. Your furry friend may exhibit behaviors that they normally would not in the home setting. These behaviors can range anywhere from a usually timid dog becoming aggressive to a confident dog becoming frightened and scared. These are all behaviors that can be avoided with the proper training and simple exercises. For more on these training techniques and exercises please visit Dr. Kay’s web blog: http://speakingforspot.com/blog, where she gets tips from Jennifer Hack, a Chicago based professional dog trainer and behavior specialist.

FitnFurry’s Guide to Common Pet Allergies

Just like humans, dogs and cats have immune systems to protect them from foreign substances. But also like in humans, animals can have allergic reactions to these foreign substances. For example: your pet may react to certain pollens, dust, an ingredient in its food, household chemicals, grooming products, and insect bites. These reactions can have a range of different effects, including itchy, swollen skin, difficulty breathing, or a disruption of the digestive tract, such as: vomiting or diarrhea.

Pets that experience these types of allergic symptoms are often pretty miserable. Allergies are chronic and can cause life-long problems for pets and pet owners. The good news is that they can be managed with the proper diagnosis and monitoring.

The first step is to determine what it is that your pet is allergic to, so as to avoid your pets contact with that allergen. Pet allergies generally fall under one of four main categories:

Contact allergies occur when your pet’s skin comes in contact with a certain material or substance it’s allergic to. Animals with skin allergies most commonly will have reactions to many types of shampoos and flea collars. The skin at the point of contact will be irritated, it may itch, become swollen or discolored, give off a strong odor, and/or loss of hair due to constant biting/scratching. Contact allergies are generally not a hard problem to solve since they’re usually confined to a specific area of your pet’s body. You can experiment by removing different materials that your pet touches or discontinue the use of grooming products until you find the one that irritates its skin. Also, many groomers often offer hypoallergenic shampoos and gentle treatments for sensitive pets.

Food allergies and food intolerance are very separate issues and knowing which you are dealing with is the first step. A pet with an intolerance to a particular food type/brand will typically experience vomiting and/or diarrhea. Pets with a food allergy generally experience skin irritations, digestive disorders, respiratory issues, and/or infections of the ear canal. Most animals are not born with allergies to food; their immune systems develop an allergic response over time to some part of their diet. This problem can arise anytime in a pet’s life, but usually occurs between 2 and 6 years of age. Even pets that have been on the same diet for a long period of time can develop an allergy to that same food. Most often the pet is allergic to a specific ingredient in the food, which can be a challenge to solve. The most common food ingredients which pets are allergic to are: beef, chicken, fish, eggs, soy, wheat, corn, and/or milk.

Once you’ve determined your pet has an allergy, you can begin the process of elimination to isolate the specific ingredient causing the reaction. This can be a long process and requires strict monitoring of your pets diet, which means no treats, vitamins, leftovers/scraps, or even plants around the house. Allergic effects of food can stay in the pets system for 8 weeks or more, so you may have to keep your pet on a special diet for up to 12 weeks to see how he/she reacts, and you may have to do this several times with several different diets before you find the one that doesn’t cause an allergic reaction.

Inhalant allergies in pets are very similar to those we humans experience. Like us, animals can be allergic to the pollen and mold in the outside air (hay fever), and dust mites, mildew, and mold that can be found indoors. These types of allergens can cause severe itching of the ears, feet, groin, and armpits of the animal, but can also be spread across the entire body. Hairless, irritated “hot spots,” caused by excessive chewing and scratching of the affected skin can also occur. Most pets with allergies to airborne particles are usually allergic to more than one. You may also find that your pet’s allergies are seasonal, for example: he/she experiences itchiness only during high-pollen seasons, like humans with hay fever. In this case you can limit your pet’s outdoor activity time during theses seasons. There are many facilities that offer indoor play areas where your pet can stay cool in the summer and warm in the winter and at the same time avoid certain allergens. Now, if your pet is suffering from an indoor allergen, or an allergen that doesn’t vary by season, there’s very little you can do to isolate him/her from that specific allergen, though you may consider an air purifier to provide some relief in the home.

Flea allergies are probably the most common problem for pets, and they aren’t actually allergic to fleas themselves, but to the proteins found in their saliva when they bite. Affected pets can itch severely from a single bite for over 5 days. If you suspect your pet has fleas try frequent baths and/or administering prescription flea applications/pills. Many professional groomers will offer flea and/or tick treatments to assist you in the removal process. We recommend consulting your veterinarian once you’ve chosen a flea repellent, so as not to cause anymore harmful reactions. You will also want to treat your pet’s environment, including bedding, upholstered furniture, and carpet. Eliminating fleas can be a tedious process and may require several treatments for your pet and home. When treating the home, we recommend having alternate accommodations for your pets so that they are not exposed to the harsh chemicals found in home treatments.

In some cases, pet owners may become frustrated by not being able to determine exactly what is causing their pet’s allergic reaction. This is when you and your veterinarian should work together. Your veterinarian may be able to conduct blood work and/or intradermal (scratch) tests to better determine what it is that your pet is allergic to and then recommend possible treatments, or combination of treatments to alleviate your pet’s symptoms.

Treatment of your pet’s allergies will require a lot of patience and determination, but rest assured, with the time and effort, you can help your uncomfortable pet start to feel comfortable again!

Last Chance to Donate to the “No Fleas” Flea Market at FitnFurry!

daycare30_stillGetting Excited!

There is only one week left to donate items! The excitement is catching on as many of you have brought in your donations. Great stuff is beginning to come in daily; don’t miss out on the fun and prizes! Make sure your friends and neighbors know about this event; they may have some things they’d like to donate too and you’ll benefit from bringing them in!

What We’ve Received so Far:

Toys, collars, harnesses, leashes, bowls, clothes, beds, doggie back-packs, designer doggie carriers, tire biter toys, a dog house and flea medication. These great donations will provide revenue for our furry friends at the Petaluma Animal Shelter and the Sonoma Humane Society!

What We Still Need:

We need many more donations to make this a success. We could use more crates, beds, slightly used leashes and collars, harnesses, doggie gates, dog or cat bowls, kitty equipment, blankets, toys for dogs or cats and flea medications.

When You Give, Fit’n’Furry Will Give Back to You!

Our wonderful donors have been drawing  from our “Dog House” of prizes. Among the prizes are:No Flea Drawing

~ 1 night of boarding for a dog, cat or bird

~Pampered Nail trim for dog or cat

~A luxurious dog bath

~Great apparel-Fit’n’Furry hats

~A fun-filled day of daycare for your pet

Remember when you bring in a new visitor who donates something you will receive $5 in “Bark Bucks”. If this new visitor becomes a client you will receive a $20 credit on your account once they use our services.

We want to be able to sponsor and give back to two of the organizations that do so much for ‘homeless’ pets. Please help us as we reach out to support them. You can make a difference so please tell everyone you know about this event and help make it a success!!

Thank you for your help. Please keep those donations coming in!

Donations accepted at Fit’n’Furry until October 17th.

The ‘No Fleas’ Flea Market will be held on Saturday October 24th from 9am to 3pm.

Our trainer, Ina, will be there from 2 pm to 3 pm to give some FREE training tips.  There will also be a representative from the Petaluma Animal Shelter & the Sonoma Humane Society.

Mew Years!

You have your New Years resolutions and your pets have theirs.  As you start the year you should keep track of who is more S0071-14successful you or your pet at conquering those resolutions.

~I don’t need to suddenly stand up while lying under the coffee table.
~I don’t need to go through the trash while my parents are out.
~I will remember the Trash Collector is not stealing!
~I will remember the Mail Man is a nice man, oh and he doesn’t taste good.
~My head doesn’t belong in the refrigerator.
~I will no longer be beholden to the sound of the can opener.
~I will grow opposable thumbs!
~I will start feeding myself and decide for myself how much is TOO MUCH!
~January 1st: Kill the sock! Must kill the sock!
~January 2nd to December 31st: Re-live victory over the sock.
~I will remember the sofa is not a scratching post, no matter how tempting.

Best Doggie Goodies in Town!

Include yourself in the drawing and you could win the GRAND PRIZE! At www.fitnfurrynews.com you can check out the prizes that will be given away, as well as the short Training Tips that we have for you to watch. It’s so easy to sign up for the drawing, you can do it in person at Fall Home Show and Family Expo at the Santa Rosa Fairgrounds, or on www.fitnfurrynews.com. We would love if you stopped by our booth at the Fall Home Show and Family Expo just to say Hello!

Toxic foods for your dog! He won’t have to look far to find them.

Tomatoes

This fruit contains tomatine which dogs cannot process; tomatine in tomatoes and solonine in potatoes are cholinesterase inhibitors – meaning they inhibit the breakdown of a neurotransmitter in nerves causing excessive stimulation.

Keep in mind that there is very little tomatine is in ripe fruit. The highest concentration is found in flowers and the lowest found in ripe fruits. Symptoms include lethargy, breathing difficulties, drooling, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea or constipation, paralysis, seizures and/or death.

Raisins/Grapes

Raisins and grapes are foods that dogs simply cannot process (exact cause unknown) and can result in kidney failure. One single serving can be fatal to a dog’s system. However, not every dog or cat is susceptible and some dogs can tolerate large quantities of grapes or raisins without any clinical signs. Additionally the amount of grapes or raisins that may cause renal failure is not exactly known, so any amount could potentially be dangerous. Given the unknowns of raisins and grapes it is best to err on the safe side and avoid giving these foods to your dog.

Garlic/Onions

While onions are stronger, both garlic and onions contain thiosulphate which can severely damage red blood cells and cause anemia, difficulty breathing and lethargy.

Avocados

Avocados contain persin which is destructive to the heart and lung as well as other tissues in animals – the exact way is unknown. Additionally the high fat in avocados can upset a dog’s stomach and cause vomiting and possibly pancreatitis . Symptoms are subtle but include breathing difficulties and a bloated abdomen.

Pits

Most fruit pits including apple seeds, cherry pits, peach pits, avocado pits, plum pits and all pits of that ilk contain cyanide which is poisonous. The accumulation of small amounts of cyanide or a large ingestion will lead to death.

Caffeine

Caffeine, which can be found in coffee grounds or tea bags, is a natural stimulant and thus stimulates the heart as well as the nervous system. Caffeine in dogs can result in vomiting, agitation, heart palpitations and possibly death. Further symptoms are similar to those associated with chocolate.

ENTER to WIN!

This weekend don’t forget to come out and join Fit’N’Furry at the Santa Rosa Home Show and Family Expo at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds. If you stop by Fit’N’Furry’s booth we will give you a Bark Buck, plus you can enter yourself in the drawing to WIN the GRAND PRIZE. To find out more about the prizes go to www.fitnfurrynews.com, you can even add yourself to the drawing from this site and we have some FREE training tips for you! We will see you at the Expo.

Are the Dogs REALLY Playing?

Have you even been at a dog park watching you pooch play, then things start to get a little more serious? All the other owners say, “Their just playing, let them have fun.” However, it is not always a good idea to let the dogs continue playing when they get too excited. There is such a thing as good and bad play, just because the dogs are playing does not mean it is appropriate behavior. We all need to remember that play is shaping our dogs behavior, and certain behaviors can develop into problems over time, both with dogs and humans.

There are some characteristics of Good Play, both dogs should be willing participants, that is one dog should not be pushing another into activity. There should always be a loose body language throughout the play session, and no one should be getting hurt or yelping in pain. If the play is to hard and fast many times things will escalate and the play can turn into a fight very quickly. Pay close attention to whether your dog is actually having fun or engaging his prey drive. Many times all that is needed is a brief distraction or interruption from you to change the tone of the play time.