Kennel Cough – The Common Doggie Cold

dogcoughing1Everyone has heard of K-9 Cough or Kennel Cough, and some of us have first hand experience with it. It is equivalent to a human catching a cough or common cold that is going around. If your dog comes down with K-9 Cough he will start coughing, but his general health will remain the same he won’t loose his appetite, have a temperature, or feel lethargic. His incessant coughing will be annoying to both you and him, but life threatening cases of this infection are extremely rare, and dogs will often recover on their own in 7-21 days without any type of treatment. It is a good idea to take your dog to the vet for treatment just to be safe, and the veterinarian will prescribe cough suppressants or antibiotics. K-9 Cough is transmitted by a virus expelled from an infected dog. This virus can be airborne, or anywhere that an infected dog has been; say in a common water dish at the dog park. Just like humans have a higher chance of catching a cold in an enclosed and heavily populated environment like an airplane, elevator, or an office, dogs have a higher chance of catching a K-9 Cough in an enclosed area that is not well ventilated. Many dogs can be carriers without exhibiting symptoms themselves and a dog may carry the virus for several days after they have fully recovered. Just like in humans some dogs are especially susceptible to the virus whereas others seems to have a higher level of immunity to it. A dog may catch K-9 Cough from a Champion show dog at a show, from the dog down the street, or from the Vet’s office. Because it is often refereed to as Kennel Cough people associate K-9 Cough with a kennel. Though dogs can catch K-9 Cough in a kennel, it is often not the source of the infection. No matter how well ventilated, spacious, and hygienic the kennel is, there is still a possibility a dog may develop K-9 Cough. In many cases the cough will simply run its course and the dog will recover. In some cases it will persist and a veterinarian will prescribe an antibiotic to assist the dogs immune system. The best method of prevention is to vaccinate the dog twice a year with the Bordetella Vaccine. This will HELP prevent K-9 cough. The Bordetella vaccine acts much like the Flu vaccine in humans. It will minimize the risk of infection but will not completely prevent it. Also, you should be aware that once your dog has received this vaccine he may carry the symptoms and either pass the illness or contract it himself simply by being vaccinated. Really the bottom line is that your dog could pick up this common doggy cold anywhere, and although it’s no fun it’s not a big deal.

Is DUPSTER DIVING Your Dog’s New Hobby?

Who ME?

I don’t know about your dog but mine has taken a liking to going through the trash, just to make sure I haven’t thrown something tasty away. He never does it while I am home, but if I leave him for a few minuets and don’t make sure to put the trash out I am certain to walk in on a MESS. I do my best to remember to put the trash out so that it won’t be a temptation, however I don’t want to know he is waiting for his moment either. So, I learned a trick! I set up a little trap, first I got a bunch of empty soda cans and a cookie sheet, then I balanced the sheet on top of the trash can with the cans on the sheet. I made sure there were some very tempting and smelly items in the trash and then I stepped out for a little walk. I didn’t go far, I just waited until I heard the clatter, so I made sure to get back in case he had the chance to get something juicy out of the trash. When I returned the cans were all over the floor and my dog was as far away from the trash can as he could be. I think I made my point! He is very careful about approaching the trash can now and generally cuts it a wide berth. The best part is that he is convinced the trash can made the noise, not me so I know he will think twice about dumpster diving whether I am there or not.